Archive for the ‘North America’

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    Coba – Another Forgotten City

    Posted in North America | June 7, 2011
    Cancun, Mexico is famous for its ancient Mayan sites. There are many sites that are world famous such as Chichen Itza as well as Tulum, but archeologists and discerning travelers in the know would recommend you to visit Coba, a forgotten city of the Mayans. The city is located quite deep in the Mexican jungle, and is a large complex with winding roads and stone structures. The remote location ensured that the city remained unfound by archaeologists until the 1920s. It is also not excavated to a large degree. The cultural value of the site is slowly being realized. The local government also had a modern road constructed to the site in the 1970’s which has made it more accessible. Tourists come here quite often nowadays. The Stone Pyramids  [...]
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    Tulum’s Ruins

    Posted in North America | May 31, 2011
    Tulum is situated fifteen mi to the south of Akumal and was at one time known as Zama, which literally means “the place of dawning.” Tulum is one of the most notable destinations for history enthusiasts from all over the world. The breathtakingly beautiful landscapes on offer here are another definite advantage. The town is situated at a bluff that overlooks the east Caribbean Sea. The ocean views along with the numerous Mayan ruins make for a great experience for everybody concerned. Tulum was a major city at the time of the Mayans between 1000 AD and 1600 AD.  The city was lived in by none other than the affluent and powerful Mayan citizens. The city was surrounded by a twenty foot wall that prevented invaders from both land as well as  [...]
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    Detroit History – Unfolding The Past

    Posted in North America | December 13, 2010
    When you think Detroit, it is understandable for terms like Motown Music and Motor City to come to mind. This town used to once be an extremely happening and hot spot. There is much more to Detroit than meets the eyes. For one, did you know that Detroit history had an important role in shaping America? Art House: This was originally known as the Elisha Taylor home that is located in Detroit. This structure is an amazing example of the Gothic Revival Home. The Art House was built in the year 1872, and the good part is that the original interiors are said to be preserved in almost as good as the original condition. For almost 30 years now, this house has been a center for architectural and art studies. This home is said to be one brilliant example  [...]
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    Pearl Harbour: Debunking the Myths

    Posted in North America | December 4, 2010
    The naval base of Pearl Harbour in Hawaii was assaulted by Japanese bomber planes and torpedoes. The attack took place on December 7, 1941. An outrage was sparked among Americans. The government and the media were left flabbergasted. President Roosevelt addressed the senate and the nation the following day. The President sought the Congress’s approval for an open war. The Congress was convinced, and they passed the historic Declaration of War on Japan. This marked America’s entry into the Second World War. Pearl Harbour was attacked on a Sunday morning. The number of soldiers on duty was minimal. A majority of offices at the naval base were shut. Many officers were on a weekend leave. The new radar that was mounted on Opana Point was functional  [...]
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    Historical Sites of Butte America

    Posted in North America | October 5, 2010
    The city of Butte in Montana has been nicknamed as Butte America. This is a city that is considered unparalleled in its historical charm and there is a lot of physical evidence of the history that once took place on these very roads. Getting Acquainted With Butte: There is a lot for the tourist to do in Montana. The awesome sites and the beautiful scenery are bound to give a lot in terms of ‘soaking in’. Yellowstone and the Glacier National Park provide for variety in their own terms. However, for the tourist who is looking to go beyond the conventional, Butte might make for an amazing option. The current population count comes in at about 34,000. This was, however, once occupied by over 100,000 people. The ancestry of Butte is said to be  [...]
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    The Bell That Is Named Liberty

    Posted in North America | August 30, 2010
    The international icon of freedom and independence for years – The Liberty Bell – can be visited even today on a trip to Philadelphia. It stands open for viewing, right across the Independence Hall. The dimensions of the Liberty Bell are somewhere around 2,080 pounds. It measures to around 12 feet across its base. It is said to be made up of one fourth tin and almost all of the other 3/4th is copper. The smaller percentage of metals involved would include arsenic, silver, gold, zinc and lead. It still, till date, hangs from what was the original yoke which is made up of American elm. Historical Overview: The bell was said to be cast in London, England. This happened in the year 1752. The Pennsylvania Assembly was the one who ordered the  [...]
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    A Historical Peek at Vancouver

    Posted in North America | August 17, 2010
    Although Vancouver may not seem like a very old city, it does have its own fair share of places with historical interest. Note: Vancouver, as we know it today, was born in 1886. Canada Place This is perhaps one of the best known landmarks of Vancouver. It is a five-sailed complex which marks the city’s waterfront. This was, once upon a time, Canada’s Pavilion at the World Expo of 1986. It is currently home to World Trade Center as well as the Vancouver Trade and Convention Center. It is also the proud house of a five – storey movie screen; which is known as the world’s first permanent IMAX Theater. If you walk around the structure, you’ll be greeted by panoramic views of the city. Local musicians and some well known names, will play  [...]
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    A Trip down Boston’s History

    Posted in North America | August 3, 2010
    The Boston Common The Boston Common covers almost fifty odd acres of the land of Boston and ends up standing witness to a lot of history that has unfolded itself on these beautiful green fields. This park is perhaps one of the oldest in the country; and is today considered the start point for the famous ‘Freedom Trail’. The Boston Common is, today, the main point in the Emerald Necklace. The Emerald Necklace is the name given to all the beautiful parks of Boston city that get intertwined with each other. The Boston Common began as a pasture land for cattle way back in the year 1634.This wasn’t, however, the only purpose that this land served. It was also witness and home to a number of public hangings; and this continued until the year  [...]
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    THE ANCIENT MAYAN TEMPLES

    Posted in North America | August 2, 2010
    The Maya Civilization is till date counted as one of the great Pre-Columbian civilizations. Their lands extended through the whole of the northern Central America region, which would include present-day Guatemala, El Salvador, and parts of Mexico, Belize and Honduras. During the period from 250 – 900 AD, most of the Mayan cities had reached what could have been dubbed as the peak of their urbanism and was characterized by large scale constructions that had been conducted. Almost every important Mayan city was seen to have a temple built in it; which throws light on the fact that the ancient Mayan temples had an integral role to play in the Mayan culture. The reasons for the decline of Mayan centers are not well known, but most of them withdrew  [...]
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    DALLAS IN TEXAS COULD WELL BE A HISTORICAL TRAVEL SPOT

    Posted in North America | July 20, 2010
    Dallas in Texas is known for one interesting tidbit about its past. This was one place that everybody seemed to want in terms of getting their hands on it; but then again, Dallas wanted to run itself. The most interesting turn in the history of Dallas and Texas was when France and Spain both simultaneously tried to claim their stake on this region. All this, in spite of the fact that the Caddo Native Indians were settled there already! Spain got hold of the territory of Texas and it became the northern boundary for New Spain. Another turn of events was brought about by Mexico declaring itself free in the year 1821. When this happened, Texas became a part of Mexico in 1836. For about a good 10 years after that, Texas ran as an independent country  [...]
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