Archive for August, 2010

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    The Bell That Is Named Liberty

    Posted in North America | August 30, 2010
    The international icon of freedom and independence for years – The Liberty Bell – can be visited even today on a trip to Philadelphia. It stands open for viewing, right across the Independence Hall. The dimensions of the Liberty Bell are somewhere around 2,080 pounds. It measures to around 12 feet across its base. It is said to be made up of one fourth tin and almost all of the other 3/4th is copper. The smaller percentage of metals involved would include arsenic, silver, gold, zinc and lead. It still, till date, hangs from what was the original yoke which is made up of American elm. Historical Overview: The bell was said to be cast in London, England. This happened in the year 1752. The Pennsylvania Assembly was the one who ordered the  [...]
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    The Ancient Roman Temple at Baalbek

    Posted in Europe | August 23, 2010
    The temple complex of Baalbek lies around 86,000 meters to the northeast of Beirut, Lebanon. These ruins are considered by many, to be the most enigmatic and holiest of holy places that existed during the ancient times. The Romans conquered the site much later; and the Phoenicians constructed this elaborate temple dedicated to Baal at a later stage. Before all of this, however, there was at a Baal, what could be dubbed as the ‘largest ever stone block construction’ of the world. Who was Baal? The origin of the name – ‘Baalbek’ – has also been shrouded with its own share of mysteries. There are a couple of opposing schools of thought that claim different things about the name of this historical site. The Phoenixes used the term Baal  [...]
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    A Historical Peek at Vancouver

    Posted in North America | August 17, 2010
    Although Vancouver may not seem like a very old city, it does have its own fair share of places with historical interest. Note: Vancouver, as we know it today, was born in 1886. Canada Place This is perhaps one of the best known landmarks of Vancouver. It is a five-sailed complex which marks the city’s waterfront. This was, once upon a time, Canada’s Pavilion at the World Expo of 1986. It is currently home to World Trade Center as well as the Vancouver Trade and Convention Center. It is also the proud house of a five – storey movie screen; which is known as the world’s first permanent IMAX Theater. If you walk around the structure, you’ll be greeted by panoramic views of the city. Local musicians and some well known names, will play  [...]
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    Byodoin, Uji-shi, near Kyoto – One of the oldest Japanese temples

    Posted in Asia | August 16, 2010
    Byodoin is a really popular Buddhist temple located in Uji. This temple has been labeled a World Heritage Site and also a National Treasure. The structure is featured on the local ¥10 coin. This temple was initially a private residence, just like most temples of Japan and it was built in the year 998 AD in the Heian period. It was later converted into a temple by a Fujiwara clan member in 1052. In 1053, the Phoenix Hall was included to house the image of Amida Buddha. The complex of the temple was really big initially but then most of the buildings around it were razed in the 1336 civil war. The beach of the pond originally stretched all the way up to the Uji River. There were mountains on the rivers opposite site that served as a background.  [...]
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    Ancient city of Anuradhapura in Sri Lanka

    Posted in Asia | August 12, 2010
    Location: This old world city is located in the Island nation of Sri Lanka which is lies to the south of the Indian Subcontinent. The city of Anuradhapura is 205km away from the capital city of Colombo. The Tree of Enlightenment: A cutting from the Buddhas tree of enlightenment formed the epicenter of the design and symbolic planning of the holy and sacred city of Anuradhapura. The fig tree under which Buddha is said to have attained enlightenment was brought to this city in the 3rd century BC by Sanghamitta. The city of Anuradhapura was the main religious and political center for the native people of Sri Lanka. Hidden secrets now revealed! This beautiful city with its varied monuments, monasteries, palaces is a stunning place which flourished  [...]
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    Persepolis (near Shiraz, Iran)

    Posted in Asia | August 10, 2010
    Eons have passed and much has changed in the twenty six hundred years that have passed since it was first built, and much of it has been destroyed but vestiges of bygone glory still remain. It lies at the foot of the Mount of Mercy, but mercy was something it was not shown by Alexander of Macedonia as the mighty structure was burnt and with it a monument of rare beauty was lost. Of the original structure, only the pillars that mark out the Hall of a Hundred Columns stands today and witnessing it you being to realize the wealth and might of the ancient Persian empire. It was a civilization that spanned the Indus in India to Thrace in Greece, and from the Volga in Russia to the Nile in Egypt, and at its center was Persepolis. Many believe that  [...]
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    Stepping in the York Minster

    Posted in Europe | August 9, 2010
    In the northern Britain, the York Minster is the impressive and charming Gothic cathedral located in York. Religiously, the cathedral is the seat of an archbishop second in rank to that of Canterbury, while attractively, it is the home of a big series of medieval stained glass. The York Minster was first erected in a hurry as early as in 627 to baptize Edwin, the king of Northumbria. After this, fire and invasions took its toll and what you see today is the renovation effort from the 18th to 20th centuries. Exploring the Site York Minster, featuring all the key phases of Gothic architecture in the nation, holds a broad and adorned Gothic nave (1275-1290), an adorned Gothic chapter house (1275-1290), a perpendicular Gothic choir and east end,  [...]
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    Maison Carree in Nimes, France

    Posted in Europe | August 5, 2010
    The Maison Carree is an ancient structure that stands till date in Nimes, which is located in current day southern France. It is believed to be one of the best preserved temples of Ancient Rome which is found anywhere in the territory that made for the former Roman Empire. A look at its history Marcus Agrippa was an extremely powerful general who was considered highly successful. He was also said to be right hand man, the son-in-law and the worthy successor of Caesar Augustus. He was also considered the patron to the magnificent Pantheon in Rome. The construction of this temple was commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the year 19 BC. This was the time of the reign of Caesar Augustus. This dating cannot be absolutely etched in stone. The truth  [...]
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    A Trip down Boston’s History

    Posted in North America | August 3, 2010
    The Boston Common The Boston Common covers almost fifty odd acres of the land of Boston and ends up standing witness to a lot of history that has unfolded itself on these beautiful green fields. This park is perhaps one of the oldest in the country; and is today considered the start point for the famous ‘Freedom Trail’. The Boston Common is, today, the main point in the Emerald Necklace. The Emerald Necklace is the name given to all the beautiful parks of Boston city that get intertwined with each other. The Boston Common began as a pasture land for cattle way back in the year 1634.This wasn’t, however, the only purpose that this land served. It was also witness and home to a number of public hangings; and this continued until the year  [...]
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    THE ANCIENT MAYAN TEMPLES

    Posted in North America | August 2, 2010
    The Maya Civilization is till date counted as one of the great Pre-Columbian civilizations. Their lands extended through the whole of the northern Central America region, which would include present-day Guatemala, El Salvador, and parts of Mexico, Belize and Honduras. During the period from 250 – 900 AD, most of the Mayan cities had reached what could have been dubbed as the peak of their urbanism and was characterized by large scale constructions that had been conducted. Almost every important Mayan city was seen to have a temple built in it; which throws light on the fact that the ancient Mayan temples had an integral role to play in the Mayan culture. The reasons for the decline of Mayan centers are not well known, but most of them withdrew  [...]