Archive for July, 2010

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    A historical adventure in Guatemala

    Posted in South America | July 27, 2010
    The world keeps moving-on faster than I can digest. Move-on, move-on they say. I’d rather sit back and relax. Play-by-the-rules for sometime and then reclaim my life.  I don’t want to grow old before I begin exploring the world. If I wait till then, in all those years that passed-by, I would have learned to sit back and appreciate everything without the streak of adventure. I will have to be concerned about my arthritis, my diabetes and my blood pressure. Traveling for me is more that just seeing and believing! It is eating, dancing, hearing the myths and living by them… In my old age, I might not even have a memory to remember the marvels for more than a year! The world entices me now and today. I was first mesmerized by Guatemala when  [...]
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    IMPRESSIVE INCA RUINS – Part 1

    Posted in South America | July 26, 2010
    Not much may be known about the Inca Civilization, but one thing’s for sure – the people of Inca were extremely advanced for their age and time in history. About Inca – The Inca civilization is said to have risen in the highlands of Peru, somewhere in the beginning of the 13th century. They began conquering the lands which surrounded Cuzco, which served as their heartland. They ended up creating what was, perhaps, the largest empire during the pre-Columbian era. With even little that remains of these Incan sites today, since the rest of it was plundered by conquerors, it is evident that the people of this civilization knew how to beautify and maintain utility. Let’s have a look at some of the most impressive Incan sites that there were  [...]
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    THE FAMOUS OLD WIND MILLS OF THE WORLD

    Posted in History Around The World | July 22, 2010
    Wind power has for long caught the attention of humans. The sails have put a water-vessel to motion, the crops have been threshed using the power of wind, and the turbines of a windmill have rotated using wind. The next logical step was to use wind to provide for mechanical power. The first windmill was designed and created in the 9th century and was used to grind corn as well as to pump water. The first windmills of Europe made a rather late appearance in the 12th century. They may have been inspired by the Middle East’s vertical-axle windmills. This, however, seems little unlikely given the fact that the Europeans used a different design from that which was seen in the Middle East. Almost all the windmills of Europe were seen to rotate on  [...]
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    DALLAS IN TEXAS COULD WELL BE A HISTORICAL TRAVEL SPOT

    Posted in North America | July 20, 2010
    Dallas in Texas is known for one interesting tidbit about its past. This was one place that everybody seemed to want in terms of getting their hands on it; but then again, Dallas wanted to run itself. The most interesting turn in the history of Dallas and Texas was when France and Spain both simultaneously tried to claim their stake on this region. All this, in spite of the fact that the Caddo Native Indians were settled there already! Spain got hold of the territory of Texas and it became the northern boundary for New Spain. Another turn of events was brought about by Mexico declaring itself free in the year 1821. When this happened, Texas became a part of Mexico in 1836. For about a good 10 years after that, Texas ran as an independent country  [...]
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    FOR THE LOVE OF BEER

    Posted in History Around The World | July 19, 2010
    The citizens of America have a St. Patrick’s day to get themselves hammered and binge eat corned beef. The people of Germany get their own Oktoberfest (Not fair, eh!). All said and done, this write up wasn’t meant for anyone to feel sad or like they’ve gotten the sour end of the deal. The truth is we all have our reasons to drink; but isn’t it exciting how the world has been drinking since the Stone Age. Here, we present to you, a list of some of the world’s oldest breweries that might be worth a visit if you have a penchant for these things (Well, who doesn’t!). WEIHENSTEPHAN, Germany (1040) – This might well be the oldest brewery there is standing in the world. It got its licensing done in the City of Freising in the year 1040.  [...]
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    THE OLDEST PAINTINGS OF THE APOSTLES DISCOVERED IN ROMAN CATACOMB

    Posted in Europe | July 15, 2010
    There was a great deal of hullabaloo happening at the Santa Tecla Catacombs which are situated beneath what is today, an office building, in the Ostiense area of Rome. The reason? They have found a painting of the Apostle John; and this painting may well be the oldest piece of iconography depicting the original 12 Apostles of Christianity. According to experts, this may throw some insight into the understanding of the Apostles and the way people held them in high regard during those times. The paintings have dated back to the 4th century A.D. and there are some more paintings that have been found there. There are paintings depicting Paul, Peter, Andrew and John who, according to the Bible and Christianity, were the earliest followers of Jesus  [...]
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    Terracotta Warriors of China

    Posted in Asia | July 13, 2010
    Imagine a city made entirely out of stone. The buildings made out of stone, the decorations made out of stone, and even household articles made out of stone. Seems pretty everyday, right? Now add to that living creatures made out of stones. Artists, musicians, acrobats, horses, government officials, and even warriors made out of stone. Seems downright strange doesn’t it? Well, this is exactly what the Terracotta Warriors of China looks like. And there are not a few number of them. There are thousands. The Terracotta Warriors of China was first found out accidentally by farmers in the suburb of Xi’an, in the Shaanxi Province. This happened in 1974, when the farmers were in the process of drilling a water well near Mount Li. This new  [...]
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    In Love with the Louvre…

    Posted in Europe | July 8, 2010
    Located along the Seine River in Paris, France, is a colossal structure, which is home to some of the world’s most cherished and appreciated artifacts and pieces of art. This structure was once a massive fortress, which was then converted into a palace for the King of France, Philip II. Indeed, so colossal were the halls of this palace, that Philip II and his son used to ride from one hall to another. Many years later, this building is still one of Paris’ most cherished possessions. Welcome to the Louvre. It was King Philippe Auguste who started building the Louvre as a fort against the Anglo-Normans. However, the Louvre saw a lot of demolition and additions being done to it. The French were so in love wit the Louvre that, for many  [...]
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    HOUSE TO THE DUROTRIGES, THE MAIDEN CASTLE OF DORSET

    Posted in Europe | July 6, 2010
    When you make a trip to the Maiden Castle in Dorset, which is around 2 miles south of Dorchester, you are bound to be in for a surprise if you’ve not done your homework. The first question you’ll be asking people will be ‘Where’s the castle, dude?’ The Backdrop The Maiden Castle is the most famous of the pre-Roman fortresses in Britain. It is also the largest. But it’s not a ‘castle’ in the conventional sense of the term. It is a hilltop with a huge enclosure which has a natural defense system in place – with its ditches and high banks. The castle is around 47 acres in size and has banks that tower up to around 80 feet. Christening The Castle The name ‘maiden’ for this castle could  [...]
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    The Pyramids of Egypt – Home To The King Of The Dead

    Posted in Africa | July 1, 2010
    The Pyramids of Egypt have for long caught the fancy of one and all. Regardless of whether people are there to witness one of the oldest magnificent structures; or there to evaluate its historical worth – the Pyramids of Egypt have held their mystical grip on the world. Pyramids stand as testimony to the power of the pharaohs who ruled Egypt during the stable central government. These were, in actuality, tombs that were built to house them for their afterlife. Becoming Kings Of The Dead - According to the ancient Egyptian belief, when a pharaoh died, he would become Osiris – the king of the dead. The new pharaoh, his successor, would become Horus, god of the heavens. He is also called the God who is the protector of the sun. This entire  [...]